dating personal ad website - Validating the sensor network calculus by simulations

Student will be responsible for designing, implementing, testing, and documenting independent programming projects. Problem solving using a high level programming language and object oriented software design.

validating the sensor network calculus by simulations-78validating the sensor network calculus by simulations-64validating the sensor network calculus by simulations-67

Prerequisite: Corequisite: MATH 125 or MATH 145, plus either acceptance into the KU Honors Program or consent of instructor. Mathematical foundations including logic, sets and functions, general proof techniques, mathematical induction, sequences and summations, number theory, basic and advanced counting techniques, solution of recurrence relations, equivalence relations, partial order relations, lattices, graphs and trees, algorithmic complexity, and algorithm design and analysis. Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields in a vacuum and material media. Prerequisite: MATH 220, MATH 290, PHSX 211, and EECS 211. Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields in a vacuum and material media. Prerequisite: MATH 127, MATH 220, EECS 211, and either PHSX 210 or PHSX 211. This course continues developing problem solving techniques by focusing on the imperative and object-oriented styles using Abstract Data Types.

Throughout there will be an emphasis on the development of general problem solving skills including algorithmic specification of solutions and the use of discrete structures in a variety of applications. Electromagnetic fields and Maxwell's equations for time-varying sources. Electromagnetic fields and Maxwell's equations for time-varying sources. Basic data structures such as queues, stacks, trees, and graphs will be covered. Basic notions of algorithmic efficiency and performance analysis in the context of sorting algorithms. An associated laboratory will develop projects reinforcing the lecture material. Introduction to DC and AC electrical circuit analysis techniques, AC power calculations, transformers, three-phase systems, magnetic circuits, and DC and AC machines with a focus on applications.

Prerequisite: A course in differential equations and eight hours of physics. Introduction to operational amplifiers, semiconductors, digital circuits and systems, and electronic instrumentation and measurements with a focus on applications.

Not open to electrical or computer engineering majors. Laboratory exercises intended to complement EECS 316 and EECS 317.

Students may not receive credit for both EECS 316 and EECS 317. Experiments include DC circuits, analog electronics, and digital electronics. Fourier signal analysis (series and transform); linear system analysis (continuous and discrete); Z-transforms; analog and digital filter analysis.

Comments